Wikia

Figure Skating Wiki

Mao Asada

Talk2
547pages on
this wiki
MAO-ASADA20617612

Mao Asada is a Japanese Figure skater. She is the 2010 Winter Olympic silver medalist, a two-time (2008 & 2010) World champion, a two-time (2008 & 2010) Four Continents champion, a two-time (2005–2006 & 2008–2009) Grand Prix Final champion, the 2005 World Junior champion, the 2004–2005 Junior Grand Prix Final champion and a five-time (2006–2009, 2011) Japanese national champion.

At the 2010 Winter Olympics, she became the first woman to land three triple axel jumps in the same competition.



VideosEdit

2008 1126 Mao Asada Asience CM00:31

2008 1126 Mao Asada Asience CM

Making of ふわふわマオマオ 浅田真央 Mao Asada01:52

Making of ふわふわマオマオ 浅田真央 Mao Asada

Commercial for Asience Shampoo The Making of Mao Asada's Nepia Tissue Commercial
エアロと競演07:09

エアロと競演

Mao Asda on ABC News02:25

Mao Asda on ABC News

Mao and her dog Aero competing at the 2007 Japan Super Challenge Why Mao couldn't compete in the '06 Olympics

Image GalleryEdit

TriviaEdit

  • Despite coming in first for her Ladies Free Skate routine to Waltz from Masquerade by Khatchaturian [1], Asada came in sixth at Four Continents 2009 with 57.85 points for a program where she doubled her planned triple lutz. [2]
  • NBC sports recently declared the competition between Asada and Kim Yu-Na "the best rivalry going". [3]
  • When Asada was training in California, her high school back in Japan would send her assignments to her. [4]
  • Asada's favorite school subjects are art and gymnastics. Asada particularly likes drawing landscapes. [5]
  • Asada's hobbies include ballet, hanging out with friends, listening to pop music, collecting skating pins, doing jigsaw puzzles and reading fantasy novels. Asada's favorite non-skating activity, however, is playing with her dog Aero (named after a Nestle chocolate bar) and her puppies Tiara and Komachi. [5]
  • After Nestle found out that Asada named her dog after their Aero chocolate, they featured her as the skating dog in a commercial with Asada. [5]
  • Asada and her sister Mai are goodwill ambassadors between Canada and Japan. [5]
  • Asada lists improving her English as one of her personal goals. [5]

QuotesEdit

Quote1
I want to score my personal best by giving my best performance. I want to finish with a supreme smile. [6]
Quote2


On why she took up figure skating:

Quote1
Mai and I were taking ballet and my mother thought she needed stronger ankles, so she took her to the skating rink that was only ten minutes from our house. I happened to be with her so I took lessons too. [5]
Quote2

On why she decided to return to Japan:

Quote1
I wanted to stay in Japan with my family, eat Japanese food and play with my puppy. I didn't care that my coach was not there. [5]
Quote2

Personal lifeEdit

Mao olympus

Mao and Mai promoting Olympus cameras

Mao Asada was born in Nagoya, Aichi, Japan. She was named after the Japanese actress Mao Daichi. She received her high school diploma from Chukyo High School on March 15, 2009.[7][8] After that, she enrolled in Chukyo University.

Her sister Mai Asada (two years older) is also a figure skater. She is now skating in shows.

CareerEdit

Novice and Junior careerEdit

Mao itoham

Mao in an advertisement which reads "I love Ito Ham".

Mao unitedairlines

Mao and Mai promoting United Airlines.

Mao Asada originally started out studying ballet, but switched to skating in 1995 when her sister, Mai Asada also switched from ballet to figure skating.

She won the Japanese Novice national championships in the 2002–2003 season and earned an invitation to compete at the Junior national championships, where she placed 4th. She could advance to the senior championships and placed 7th.

In the 2003–2004 season, Asada repeated the same placements at the Novice and Junior level and placed 8th at the senior nationals. She competed in the Mladost Trophy, the first international event of her career, and won it.

In the 2004–2005 season, Asada was internationally Junior age eligible. She competed on the ISU Junior Grand Prix, the Junior complement to the ISU Grand Prix of Figure Skating. She won both of her events. She won the Junior Grand Prix Final with an overall score 35.08 points ahead of the silver medalist, her future rival Kim Yu-Na. She won Junior national championships and qualified for the 2005 World Junior Figure Skating Championships. The silver medalist that year was Mai Asada, who had placed ahead of Mao Asada in the two previous years.

Mao Asada's win gave her an invitation to senior national championships, where she won the silver medal. Asada was not sent to the 2005 World Championships because she was not old enough. At the Junior World Championships, she won the event with a 20.31 lead over the silver medalist, who was once again, Kim Yu-Na.

Senior careerEdit

2005–2006 SeasonEdit

Mao Asada Spin - 2006 Skate America

Asada performs her signature one-hand biellman spin at the 2006 Skate America.

Having won everything on the Junior level, the choice was made for Asada to move to the senior level for the 2005–2006 season and compete on the Grand Prix. This choice was made knowing that Asada would not be allowed to compete at the 2006 Winter Olympics if she qualified for it, because there are two different age standards, one for the Grand Prix and the other for the Olympics and Worlds.

Asada competed on the Grand Prix for the first time in November 2005. She won the silver medal at her first event, the 2005 Cup of China, where she placed exactly 3 points ahead of 2006 Olympic Champion Shizuka Arakawa. Asada won her second event, the 2005 Trophée Eric Bompard, which she won with a 7.30 point margin of victory over silver medalist Sasha Cohen, who would later go on to win the silver medal at the 2006 Olympics. This win in Paris and silver medal from China qualified Asada for the 2005–2006 Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final. She won the event with a 8.14 margin of victory over silver medalist Irina Slutskaya, who would go on to win the bronze medal at the 2006 Olympics.

At the 2005–2006 Japan Figure Skating Championships, Asada won the silver medal behind Fumie Suguri. At that competition, Asada became the first lady to land two triple axels during a free skate program. She was not sent to the Olympics because she was not old enough. She was sent to the 2006 World Junior Figure Skating Championships, where she was the reigning champion competing against Junior Grand Prix Final Champion Kim Yu-Na. Asada placed second at the competition, placing 24.19 points behind Kim, and 18.21 points ahead of bronze medalist Christine Zukowski. At this competition, Asada became the first lady to land a triple axel in the short program at an ISU championship.

During these first two years on the international scene, Asada became known for her signature move, the one-hand biellman spin position.

2006–2007 SeasonEdit

Asada entered the 2006–2007 Grand Prix season with rival Kim Yu-Na also competing on the circuit. At her first event, the 2006 Skate America, Asada won the bronze medal behind Miki Ando and Kimmie Meissner. Asada had won the short program, but was fourth in the long program. She was 21.36 points out of first place. Asada won her second event, the 2006 NHK Trophy by a margin of victory of 20.21 points ahead of Fumie Suguri. At the NHK Trophy, Asada set a new world record for highest combined score under the ISU Judging System. Asada went into the Grand Prix Final as the reigning and defending champion. She placed second to Kim Yu-Na by a margin of 11.68 points. Asada had won the short program, but like at Skate America, placed fourth in the long program.

Asada won the 2006–2007 Japan Figure Skating Championships by 26.11 points ahead of Miki Ando and 32.04 points ahead of Yukari Nakano. At the 2007 World Figure Skating Championships, Asada was fifth in the short program 10.03 points behind Kim Yu-Na, who placed first in that section of the competition. She won the free skate with a score of 133.13 points, setting a new world record for the highest free skate score, a record which stood for eight months. She won the silver medal earning an overall of 194.95 points, 0.64 behind Miki Ando and 8.31 ahead of Kim Yu-Na, who won the bronze.

2007–2008 SeasonEdit

In the 2007–2008 season, she competed for the first time at the 2007 Skate Canada International. She won the event ahead of Nakano, after being third in the short program and first in the long program. Asada won her second gold medal of the Grand Prix season and her second Trophée Eric Bompard gold at the 2007 Trophée Eric Bompard. She advanced to the 2007–2008 Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final. In the short program, Asada did not do the jump out of footwork required element and earned a score of 59.04 in that segment of the competition, placing last in that part of the competition. She won the free skate and won the silver medal overall behind Kim Yu-Na, who repeated as champion. Even with the large mistake in the short program, Asada was only 5.24 out of first place overall, and was 12.66 points ahead of bronze medalist Carolina Kostner.

As in the previous year, Asada won the 2007–2008 Japan Figure Skating Championships, with a very small lead over silver medalist and reigning World Champion Miki Ando. The team of Asada, Ando, and Nakano was declared for the World Championships and the team of Asada, Ando, and Suguri was for the Four Continents Championships. This was Asada's first time competing at the Four Continents Championships. Asada won both segments of the 2008 Four Continents Figure Skating Championships to finish 13.71 points ahead of silver medalist Joannie Rochette. Having left her coach before Four Continents Championships, Asada competed there and at the World Championships without a coach. An official from the Japan Skating Federation accompanied her as needed.

On March 20, 2008, at the 2008 World Figure Skating Championships, Asada placed 2nd both in the short program and free skate to place first overall and win the title of World Champion. She was second in the short program with 64.10 points, 0.18 behind Carolina Kostner. In the long program, she fell at the beginning of her performance on her triple axel jump attempt earning 121.46 points. She scored a total of 185.56 points, 0.88 ahead of silver medalist Carolina Kostner. Yu-Na Kim, who won the free skate with 123.38 points, 1.92 ahead of Asada, won the bronze medal. Miki Ando withdrew from the competition in the middle of her free skate program with injury. The placements of Asada and Yukari Nakano, who placed fourth overall, qualified Japan three entries for the 2009 World Figure Skating Championships.

2008–2009 SeasonEdit

Trophée Eric Bompard 2008 Mao ASADA

Asada performs a spiral during her Claire de Lune short program at the 2008 Trophée Eric Bompard.

For the 2008–2009 Grand Prix, Asada had been assigned to the 2008 Trophée Eric Bompard and to the 2008 NHK Trophy. At the 2008 Trophée Eric Bompard, she placed second overall with a score of 167.59 points, 12.54 behind Joannie Rochette, but won gold at the 2008 NHK Trophy with 191.13 points, 23.49 more than Akiko Suzuki. That victory supposed her the qualification for the for the 2008–2009 Grand Prix Final.

At the 2008–2009 Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final, Asada placed second in the short program with a score of 65.39 points, behind Kim Yu-Na by a margin of 0.56. With 123.17 points after landing two clean triple axels for the first time in an ISU sanctioned event, one in combination with a double toe-loop, Asada won the free skate and the competition overall, scoring 188.55 points. Asada made history after her Grand Prix Final performance by becoming the first woman to land two triple axels in an ISU competition.

After her win at the Grand Prix Final, Asada defended her national championship title at the 2008–2009 Japan Figure Skating Championships. In her short program, Asada's second jump in a planned triple flip-triple loop combination was downgraded to a single loop. She received 65.20 points for her short program and placed second behind Yukari Nakano. Asada landed six triple jumps in her free skate program, but three of them were downgraded, including two triple axels which were judged to be under-rotated. She received 117.15 points for her free skate for a total of 182.45 points overall. Placing second both in the short program and in the free skate, Asada managed to gain enough points to win her third straight national championship.

Asada came into the 2009 Four Continents Championships held in Vancouver, Canada as the defending champion. However, she had a short program placing sixth with only 57.86 points in comparison to the leader, Kim Yu-Na, who scored 72.24. Asada rebounded in the freeskate to win that portion of the event with 118.66. Her first triple axel attempt was popped into a single, but she successfully executed the second, garnering 8.80 points for the jump. She also completed a triple flip-double loop-double loop, a triple loop, and a triple flip-double loop. Her triple toe loop was downgraded to a double, but she finished the routine with a double axel and spins, spirals, and footwork. Asada placed third overall in the competition behind Joannie Rochette of Canada who won silver and Kim Yu-Na who won the gold.

At the 2009 World Figure Skating Championships, Asada placed third in the short program with 66.06 points and placed 4th in the free skate, where she scored 122.03 points and finished in fourth place with a combined total score of 188.09 points.

Asada then competed at the last ISU event of the 2008–2009 season, the inaugural 2009 World Team Trophy. In the short program she earned 75.84 points, a personal best, and led the ladies competition. She won the long program with 126.03 points, and finished with a winning total score of 201.87, a personal best. The Japanese team finished third overall at that event, trailing the United States and Canada.

2009–2010 seasonEdit

For the 2009–2010 Grand Prix series, Asada placed 3rd in the short program and 2nd in the free skate finishing 2nd at 2009 Trophée Eric Bompard, 36.04 points behind gold medalist Kim Yu-Na. She placed 6th in the short and 5th in the free after landing just two triple jumps in her free program at 2009 Rostelecom Cup and finished 5th, 21.65 points behind gold medalist Miki Ando.

Asada won her fourth Japanese national title at the 2009–2010 Japan Figure Skating Championships. She placed first in both the short program and the free skate and won the gold medal overall with a score of 204.62 points, 8.72 points ahead of silver medalist Akiko Suzuki.

At the 2010 Four Continents Figure Skating Championships, Asada placed third in the short program with 57.22 points after underrotating her triple axel, popping a triple flip and receiving a timing deduction of 1.00 point. Then she won the free skate with 126.74 points, 11.9 ahead of Akiko Suzuki. She won the gold medal overall with a score of 183.96 points, 10.24 points ahead of Suzuki.

From February 23–25 Asada competed in the ladies event at the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. In the short program on February 23, she executed a triple axel-double toe loop combination, a triple flip and a double axel as well as receiving level fours for all her spins and her spiral sequence. She scored 73.78 points to place second in this phase. In her free skate on February 25, she succeeded in landing two triple axels, but made mistakes on two other jump elements in her program. She under-rotated a triple flip jump in her triple flip-double loop-double loop combination and popped a planned triple toe loop into a single jump. With 131.72 points from the free skate she won the Olympic silver medal with a combined score of 205.50 points. She earned a Guinness World Record for the most triple axels performed in a competition, one in the short program and two in the free skate.[9]

At the 2010 World Figure Skating Championships, she placed second in the short program with 68.08 points, 2.32 behind Mirai Nagasu of the United States. In her triple axel-double toe loop combination, the triple axel was downgraded to a double, but she executed a triple flip and a double axel and received level fours on all her spins and her spiral sequence. She was also second in the free skate with 129.50 points, 0.99 behind Kim Yu-Na, after executing a triple axel, a downgraded triple axel-double toe loop combination, a triple flip-double loop, a triple loop, a triple flip-double loop-double loop, a triple toe loop and a double axel. Asada won the gold medal with the overall combined score of 197.58 points.

2010–2011 seasonEdit

For the 2010–2011 ISU Grand Prix season, Asada placed 8th in the short program and free skate and finished 8th overall with 133.40 at the NHK Trophy. At the 2010 Trophée Eric Bompard, Asada placed 7th in the short program, 5th in the free skate and fifth overall with 148.02 points.

At the 2010 Japan national championships she finished 1st in the short program and second in the free skating for a total score of 193.69 and won the silver medal behind Miki Ando.

At the 2011 Four Continents Figure Skating Championships, Asada placed second in the short program and also second in the free skate. She won the silver medal overall with a score of 196.30 points, 5.04 points behind gold medalist Miki Ando.

At the 2011 World Figure Skating Championships, Asada placed 7th in the short program, 6th in the free skate and finished 6th overall with 172.79 points.

2011–2012 seasonEdit

At the 2011 NHK Trophy, Asada placed 3rd in the short program with 58.32 points. She was first in the free skate gathering 184.45 and won the silver medal, 1.79 behind Akiko Suzuki. At the 2011 Cup of Russia, Asada placed first in the short program with 64.29. She earned a level four on her straight line step sequence with +1.30 GOE. She won the event and qualified for the Grand Prix Final. She withdrew from the Final due to her mother's serious illness.[10] Her mother died of liver cirrhosis in Nagoya Hospital while Asada was flying back to Japan.[11][12]

Asada placed 2nd in both the short and free skate at the 2011 Japanese National Championship and earned her fifth national title and secured a berth to the 2012 World Championships in Nice, France. She competed at the 2012 ISU Four Continents Championships where she was 1st in short program and 2nd in the free skate and won the silver medal overall behind gold medalist Ashley Wagner of the United States.

At the 2012 World Figure Skating Championships, Asada placed 4th in the short program, 6th in the free skate and finished 6th overall with 164.52 points.

2012–2013 seasonEdit

For the 2012–2013 season, Asada has been assigned to Cup of China and NHK Trophy.

Jumping techniqueEdit

WC2008 SPLadies Asada JPN 2

Asada performs her step sequence at the 2008 World Championships. This program was choreographed for her by Tatiana Tarasova, who began coaching her in the 2008 summer.

Trophée Eric Bompard EX 2008 Mao ASADA

Asada during her Por una Cabeza exhibition program at the 2008 Trophée Eric Bompard.

Asada landed her first triple axel jump at the age of 12, and she became the first lady to perform a triple-triple-triple (a triple flip, triple loop, triple toe loop) combination in national competition. At the age of 14, Asada landed a triple axel in her free skating program at the 2004 Junior Grand Prix Final, held in December 2004 at Helsinki (Finland), becoming the first junior girl to do one in an international event. She has since been known for her triple axel jumps.

Asada practices quadruple loops and toe loops, but has yet to land one cleanly. However, at 2008 NHK Trophy, she began to perform her lutz with no edge error from the technical caller.

Asada has had problems with the triple toe loop jump, and did not include Salchow jumps in her junior and senior career programs until 2008. She had stated previously that the Salchow was the first triple jump she had ever landed and that she did not have a problem landing it cleanly, but she was not comfortable using the jump in competition because it is one of her least favorite jumps. a triple flip-triple toe. In the 2006–2007 season she used the double axel-triple toe, while in the 2007–2008 season she performed the triple flip-triple toe again. In the 2008–2009 season she executed the triple axel-double toe in international competition, first getting full credit for it at the 2008-2009 Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final.

Coaching changesEdit

Rafael Arutunian Mao Asada and Tatiana Tarasova

Arutunian, Tarasova and Asada at the 2007-08 Grand Prix Final.

Asada originally trained in Japan, but left for the U.S. in August 2006 to train with Rafael Arutunian in Lake Arrowhead, California. There, she was able to escape the overcrowding of Japanese rinks and the pressure of the Japanese media.

Before 2008 Four Continents Championships, she split with Arutunian and returned to Japan to practice on the new Aurora Rink at Chukyo University, where she does not have any problems getting ice time. She went to Worlds without a coach.

During the summer of 2007, Asada received additional training in Russia from Tatiana Tarasova, while Arutunian remained her primary coach. The following summer, after leaving Arutunian, Asada returned to Russia, and formally decided to be coached by Tarasova.[13] However, their cooperation was hampered by Tarasova's health problems and Asada trained mostly in Nagoya, Japan, with her assistant Jeanetta Folle; in February 1, 2010, Asada indicated she had not been coached by Tarasova since the 2009 Cup of Russia in October.[14] Tarasova was present with Asada at the 2010 Olympics but after the event, Asada chose to be based in her hometown Nagoya and parted ways with Tarasova.[15]

On June 17, 2010 Asada announced that her new jump coach was Hiroshi Nagakubo.[16] In September 2010, Nobuo Sato became Asada's new coach and Asada ended her relationship with coach Nagakubo.[17][18]

Public life and endorsementsEdit

Asada owns a miniature poodle named Aero, who is named after the chocolate confection made by Nestlé. Asada and Aero have been featured in chocolate commercials in Japan, and she has also used her dog in exhibition programs. In 2008, Asada got two new puppies named Tiara and Komachi.[19]

Asada is very popular in Japan and has appeared in variety shows, as well as in commercials for Oji Paper Company, Sato pharmacy, Morinaga Weider in Jelly, Itoham Foods, Nestlé, Kao, Omron, Nippon Life Insurance Company and Weavajapan. Asada headlined her own exhibition show, called "The Ice", from the summer of 2008,[20] with her sister Mai. The Asada sisters have also been named as goodwill ambassadors to Canada, and have traveled to Canada to serve in that role.[19] Asada's sponsors[21] include Sato pharmacy, Itoham Foods, Nepia, Lotte, Omron, United Airlines, Weider in Jelly and Weavajapan inc.

In 2011, Asada launched her own kimono brand MaoMao.[22]

In January 2012, Asada cancelled the release of a book on her skating career; she stated, "The way the book was advertised was different from what I had in mind."[23]


CDsEdit

  • Mai & Mao Asada Skating Music (EMI Music Japan)
  • Mai & Mao Asada Skating Music 2008-09(EMI Music Japan)

BooksEdit

ProgramsEdit

Season Short program Long program Exhibition
2011–2012 Scheherazade
by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
choreography by Tatiana Tarasova
Liebesträume
by Franz Liszt
choreography by Lori Nichol
I Vow to Thee My Country
by Libera
choreography by Lori Nichol

Waltz Op. 64 No. 2
by Fréderic Chopin
choreography by Tatiana Tarasova

2010–2011 Tango
Soundtrack from Agony
by Alfred Schnittke
choreography by Tatiana Tarasova
Liebesträume
by Franz Liszt
choreography by Lori Nichol
Ballade No. 1 in G minor, Op. 23, CT. 2
by Fréderic Chopin
choreography by Tatiana Tarasova
2009–2010 Waltz from Masquerade Suite
by Aram Khachaturian
choreography by Tatiana Tarasova
Bells of Moscow
by Sergei Rachmaninov
choreography by Tatiana Tarasova
Caprice No. 24
by Niccolò Paganini
choreography by Tatiana Tarasova
2008–2009 Claire de Lune
by Claude Debussy
choreography by Lori Nichol
Waltz from Masquerade Suite
by Aram Khachaturian
choreography by Tatiana Tarasova
Por una Cabeza
Scent of a Woman Soundtrack
by Carlos Gardel and
Alfredo Le Pera

& Payadora
by Julián Plaza
choreography by Tatiana Tarasova


Sing, Sing, Sing
by Louis Prima
choreography by Lori Nichol
2007–2008 Fantasia for Violin and Orchestra
from Ladies in Lavender
by Jean-Claude Petit
performed by Joshua Bell
choreography by Tatiana Tarasova
Fantaisie-Impromptu
by Fréderic Chopin
choreography by Lori Nichol
So Deep Is The Night
Étude Op. 10, No. 3
by Frederic Chopin
vocals by Lesley Garrett
choreography by Lori Nichol
2006–2007 Nocturne No.2 Op. 9–2
in E flat major
by Frederic Chopin
choreography by Lori Nichol
Csárdás
by Vittorio Monti
choreography by Lori Nichol
Habanera
from Carmen
by Georges Bizet
vocal by Filippa Giordano
choreography by Lori Nichol
2005–2006 Carmen
by Georges Bizet
choreography by Machiko Yamada
and Mihoko Higuchi
The Nutcracker
by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
choreography by Lori Nichol
Over the Rainbow
by Harold Arlen
vocal by Eva Cassidy
choreography by Lori Nichol
2004–2005 Over the Rainbow
by Harold Arlen
choreography by Lea Ann Miller
La Boutique Fantastique
by Gioachino Rossini and Ottorino Respighi
choreography by Lea Ann Miller
Pick Yourself Up
by Natalie Cole
choreography by Machiko Yamada
and Mihoko Higuchi
2003–2004 Orchestral Suite from My Girl 2
by Cliff Eidelman
choreography by Machiko Yamada
and Mihoko Higuchi
Waltz-Scherzo in C major Op. 34
by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
choreography by Machiko Yamada
and Mihoko Higuchi
Habanera
from Carmen
by Georges Bizet
choreography by Machiko Yamada
and Mihoko Higuchi
2002–2003 Say Hey Kids
choreography by Machiko Yamada
and Mihoko Higuchi
Inca Dance and Andes
by Cusco
choreography by Machiko Yamada
and Mihoko Higuchi

Competitive highlightsEdit

2008 NHK Trophy ladies podium

Asada (center) with other medalists at the 2008 NHK Trophy podium.

Post-2006Edit

Event 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13
Winter Olympic Games 2nd
World Championships 2nd 1st 4th 1st 6th 6th
Four Continents Championships 1st 3rd 1st 2nd 2nd
Japanese Championships 1st 1st 1st 1st 2nd 1st
Grand Prix Final 2nd 2nd 1st WD
Trophée Eric Bompard 1st 2nd 2nd 5th
NHK Trophy 1st 1st 8th 2nd TBD
Rostelecom Cup 5th 1st
Skate Canada 1st
Skate America 3rd
Cup of China TBD
World Team Trophy 1st*
Japan Open 3rd** 5th***
WD = Withdrew
  • *Asada placed 1st in the ladies event; Team Japan was 3rd overall.
  • **Asada placed 3rd in the ladies event; Team Japan was 1st overall
  • *** Asada placed 5th in the ladies event; Team Japan was 1st overall.

Pre-2006Edit

2008 WC Ladies Podium

Asada (center) with other medalists at the 2008 World Championships podium.

Event/Season 2002–2003 2003–2004 2004–2005 2005–2006
World Junior Championships 1st 2nd
Japanese Championships 7th 8th 2nd 2nd
Japanese Junior Championships 4th 4th 1st
Japanese Novice Championships 1st 1st
Grand Prix Final champion 1st
Trophée Eric Bompard 1st
Cup of China 2nd
2004 Junior Grand Prix Final 1st
2004 Junior Grand Prix Final 1st
2004 Junior Grand Prix Final 1st
Mladost Trophy 1st

Detailed resultsEdit

Post-2006Edit

2011–2012 season
Date Event SP FS Total
March 26–31, 2012 2012 ISU World Championships 4
59.49
6
105.03
6
164.52
February 7–12, 2012 2012 ISU Four Continents Championships 1
64.25
2
124.37
2
188.62
December 22–26, 2011 2011–2012 Japanese National Championships 2
65.40
2
118.67
1
184.07
November 24–27, 2011 2011 ISU Grand Prix Rostelecom Cup 1
64.29
1
118.96
1
183.25
November 11–13, 2011 2011 ISU Grand Prix NHK Trophy 3
58.42
1
125.77
2
184.19
2010–2011 season
Date Event SP FS Total
April 24 – May 1, 2011 2011 ISU World Championships 7
58.66
6
114.13
6
172.79
February 15–20, 2011 2011 ISU Four Continents Championships 2
63.41
2
132.89
2
196.30
December 23–26, 2010 2010–2011 Japanese National Championships 1
66.22
2
127.47
2
193.69
November 26–28, 2010 2010 ISU Grand Prix Trophée Eric Bompard 7
50.10
5
97.92
5
148.02
October 22–24, 2010 2010 ISU Grand Prix NHK Trophy 8
47.95
8
85.45
8
133.40
October 2, 2010 2010 Japan Open (individual) 5
92.44
File:Mao Asada 2010 Olympic medal ceremony.jpg
2009–2010 season
Date Event SP FS Total
March 22–28, 2010 2010 ISU World Championships 2
68.08
2
129.50
1
197.58
February 14–27, 2010 2010 Winter Olympic Games 2
73.78
2
131.72
2
205.50
January 25–31, 2010 2010 ISU Four Continents Championships 3
57.22
1
126.74
1
183.96
December 25–27, 2009 2009–2010 Japanese National Championships 1
69.12
1
135.50
1
204.62
October 22–25, 2009 2009 ISU Grand Prix Rostelecom Cup 6
51.94
5
98.34
5
150.28
October 15–18, 2009 2009 ISU Grand Prix Trophée Eric Bompard 3
58.96
2
115.03
2
173.99
October 3, 2009 2009 Japan Open (individual) 3
102.94
2008–2009 season
Date Event SP FS Total
April 15–19, 2009 2009 ISU World Team Trophy 1
75.84
1
126.03
1
201.87
March 23 – 29, 2009 2009 ISU World Championships 3
66.06
4
122.03
4
188.09
February 4–8, 2009 2009 ISU Four Continents Championships 6
57.86
1
118.66
3
176.52
December 25 – 27, 2008 2008–2009 Japanese National Championships 2
65.30
2
117.15
1
182.45
December 11–14, 2008 2008–2009 ISU Grand Prix Final 2
65.38
1
123.17
1
188.55
November 27 – 30, 2008 2008 ISU Grand Prix NHK Trophy 1
64.64
1
126.49
1
191.13
November 13 – 16, 2008 2008 ISU Grand Prix Trophée Eric Bompard 2
58.12
2
109.47
2
167.59
Mao Asada 2008 World Championships

Asada with her gold medal at the 2008 World Figure Skating Championships

2007–2008 season
Date Event SP FS Total
March 17–23, 2008 2008 ISU World Championships 2
64.10
2
121.46
1
185.56
February 13–17, 2008 2008 ISU Four Continents Championships 1
60.94
1
132.31
1
193.25
December 26–28, 2007 2007–2008 Japanese National Championships 1
72.92
2
132.41
1
205.33
December 13–16, 2007 2007–2008 ISU Grand Prix Final 6
59.04
1
132.55
2
191.59
November 15 – 18, 2007 2007 ISU Grand Prix Trophée Eric Bompard 1
56.90
1
122.90
1
179.80
November 1 – 4, 2007 2007 ISU Grand Prix Skate Canada 3
58.08
1
119.58
1
177.66
2006–2007 season
Date Event SP FS Total
March 19–25, 2007 2007 ISU World Championships 5
61.32
1
133.13
2
194.45
December 27–29, 2006. 2006–2007 Japanese National Championships 1
71.14
1
140.62
1
211.76
December 14–17, 2006 2006–2007 ISU Grand Prix Final 1
69.34
4
103.18
2
172.52
November 30 – December 3,
2006
2006 ISU Grand Prix NHK Trophy 1
69.50
1
130.02
1
199.52
October 26 – 29, 2006 2006 ISU Grand Prix Skate America 1
68.84
4
102.39
3
171.23
  • Personal bests highlighted in bold
  • ISU seasons' bests highlighted in Italic.

Pre-2006Edit

2005–2006 season
Date Event Level QR SP FS Total
March 6–12, 2006 2006 ISU World Junior Championships Junior 1
113.58
2
56.10
2
97.25
2
153.35
December 23–25, 2005 2005–2006 Japanese National Championships Senior 3
66.64
3
121.46
2
188.10
December 16 – 18, 2005 2005–2006 ISU Grand Prix Final Senior 1
64.38
1
125.24
1
189.62
November 17–20, 2005 2005 ISU Grand Prix Trophée Eric Bompard Senior 1
63.96
1
118.46
1
182.42
November 2–6, 2005 2005 ISU Grand Prix Cup of China Senior 2
62.92
3
113.68
2
176.60
2004–2005 season
Date Event Level QR SP FS Total
February 26 – March 3,
2005
2005 World Junior Championships Junior 1
112.32
1
60.11
1
119.13
1
179.24
December 24–26, 2004. 2004–2005 Japanese National Championships Senior 4
60.46
2
106.36
2
166.82
December 2–5, 2004 2004–2005 ISU Junior Grand Prix Final Junior 1
57.91
1
114.92
1
172.83
September 29 – October 3,
2004
2004 ISU Junior Grand Prix, Ukraine Junior 1
56.24
1
86.75
1
142.99
September 9–12, 2004 2004 ISU Junior Grand Prix, USA Junior 1
50.14
1
87.88
1
138.02
2003–2004 season
Date Event Level TFP SP FS Total
March 10–13, 2004 2004 Mladost Trophy Novice 1.5 1 1 1
December 2–5, 2003 2003 Helena Pajovic Cup Novice 2.0 2 1 1
  • QR = Qualifying round; SP = Short program; FS = Free skating


ReferencesEdit

  1. Four Continents Figure Skating Championships, Elvin Walker, Golden Skate. February 7, 2009.
  2. Asada struggles as Kim seizes lead, Gulf Daily News. February 6, 2009.
  3. Figure skating: What to expect, Lee Ann Gschwind, Universal Sports. January 26, 2009.
  4. Transcript of Japan Skates' interview with Mao Asada at Skate Canada, November 3., Japan Skates. November 3, 2007.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 Asada Assumes Azimuth, Golden Skate, Barry Mittan. June 7, 2008.
  6. Figure skater Asada seeks 'supreme smile' before Olympics, Google AFP. December 29, 2008.
  7. [http://web-japan.org/trends/sports/spo061222.html Strength In Numbers
  8. ][http://nagoya.nikkansports.com/news/f-nn-tp2-20060407-16207.html "The local news article of Asada entered high school"
  9. Mao honored for world record
  10. Family emergency keeps Asada out of Final Lynn Rutherford, Ice Network, 8 December 2011
  11. Figure skating: Mao Asada's mother passes away Kyodo News English, December 9, 2011
  12. Mao was blessed with a mother who gave it her all Jack Gallagher, Japan Times, December 14, 2011
  13. What now for Mao? Jack Gallagher, The Japan Times, March 10, 2010
  14. Mao Asada fights back Tatiana Kondakova GoldenSkate February 1, 2010
  15. No tears, but Nagasu still must get past fears Philip Hersh Chicago Tribune March 27, 2010
  16. The former coach of Shizuka becomes the coach of Mao for jumps. Nikkan Sports, June 18, 2010
  17. Asada names new coach Associated Press, | Universal Sports September 7, 2010
  18. Why Nobuo Sato is a good choice for Asada Alexa Ainsworth, Universal Sports, September 7, 2010
  19. 19.0 19.1 Asada Assumes Azimuth Barry Mittan GoldenSkate 2008-06-27
  20. The Ice
  21. Mao Asada official website-sponsorships
  22. MaoMao
  23. Skater Mao Asada's book release cancelled over 'wrong publicity' The Mainichi Daily News, January 13, 2012

External linksEdit

Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki